Funding secured for volunteers at Liverpool Festival Gardens

25 September 2013

A grant worth nearly £139,000 has been awarded to The Land Trust, by Big Lottery Fund's Reaching Communities programme. It will develop a support framework to engage and unite communities around the iconic Liverpool Festival Gardens site and increase volunteer opportunities.

A grant worth nearly £139,000 has been awarded to The Land Trust, by Big Lottery Fund’s Reaching Communities programme.  It will develop a support framework to engage and unite communities around the iconic Liverpool Festival Gardens site and increase volunteer opportunities. This project has been named 'Green Angels' after the valuable volunteers who work in these fantastic gardens. The scheme will focus on bringing communities together and will involve attracting volunteers to work at the park; provide key training to develop new skills; and introduce a Community Engagement Officer. The project will provide new opportunities for local residents and establish a strong network of Green Angels to care for this Liverpool landmark.

Euan Hall, Chief Executive at the Land Trust, who manages the site on behalf of Langtree, comments: "This is a fantastic project that will, encourage social cohesion and provide new skills and training for unemployed and retired people in the area. It will also engage local residents in activities that will provide physical and mental health benefits; and create a sense of pride and ownership in this unique community space".

Liverpool Festival Gardens is managed on a day-to-day basis by The Conservation Volunteers and they will play a key part in the project by working closely with the Green Angels project delivery team.

The direction of this project will be led by participants but include environmental improvements, such as weeding and planting, painting and litter clearance; community events, such as, wildlife walks and family activities; outreach programmes and education initiatives, from training in use of tools, to horticulture, plant and wildlife identification and health activities.

Liverpool Festival Gardens reopened in June 2012 after it was left derelict in 1997 and has already attracted nearly 200,000 visitors. Its restoration includes pagodas in the oriental gardens, the Moon Wall, new lakes, waterways and waterfalls and pedestrian access linking to the promenade. There is already a regular volunteer team onsite, and this project will build upon this, increasing the numbers of volunteers, providing support and developing a range of new skills.